Hayao Miyazaki Called “Anti-Japanese”, a “Traitor”, and “Dim-Witted”His new film Kaze Tachinu finally deals with the issue of “comfort women” (Women from China, Korea, etc who were forced into prostitution to serve the Japanese Military in World War II) and now the movie is making a lot of people angry. 

Hayao Miyazaki Called “Anti-Japanese”, a “Traitor”, and “Dim-Witted”

His new film Kaze Tachinu finally deals with the issue of “comfort women” (Women from China, Korea, etc who were forced into prostitution to serve the Japanese Military in World War II) and now the movie is making a lot of people angry. 

69 Years Ago Today

69 Years Ago Today

(Source: reddit.com)

New Nazi Movie Where Sean Bean Probably Dies…

During the early hours of June 6th 1944 a bloody but victorious offensive took place in occupied Western Europe that would claim thousands of lives. Codenamed ‘Operation Overlord’ the armies of the combined allied forces would begin their long push to Berlin, with the aim of bringing down the despised Nazi regime.

But the chilling realities of Hitler’s true intentions are exposed, to create a force that can never be beaten, a 4th Reich - The New World Order. A team of Nazi doctors and scientists were charged with generating a superior race. Their experiments and research would produce unspeakable evil and change the face of humanity forever. A small select brigade of soldiers from the British 3rd Infantry Division, under the command of the battle hardened Captain Bathurst embark on a dangerous quest to liberate Europe. Fighting their way through the French countryside, villages and war ravaged towns. Every advance they discover increasingly strange events until they reach an abandoned research facility where the true horrors begin.

io9.com

A welder at a boat-and-sub-building yard adjusts her goggles before resuming work, October, 1943. By 1945, women comprised well over a third of the civilian labor force (in 1940, it was closer to a quarter) and millions of those jobs were filled in factories: building bombers, manufacturing munitions, welding, drilling and riveting for the war effort.http://life.time.com/history/wwii-the-pictures-we-remember/#13

A welder at a boat-and-sub-building yard adjusts her goggles before resuming work, October, 1943. By 1945, women comprised well over a third of the civilian labor force (in 1940, it was closer to a quarter) and millions of those jobs were filled in factories: building bombers, manufacturing munitions, welding, drilling and riveting for the war effort.

http://life.time.com/history/wwii-the-pictures-we-remember/#13

Cardboard Warfare 2!

Robert and Susan Downey to Produce USS Indianapolis Sinking Story for Warner Bros.

The story of the sinking of the USS Indianapolis during World War II and the horrifying shark ordeal continues to intrigue Hollywood, 60 years after hundreds of men perished in the event.

Warner Bros. and Robert and Susan Downey are tackling the incident through a modern lens, looking at it through the eyes of Hunter Scott, the 11-year old boy who embarked on a journey to exonerate the Indianapolis’ court-martialed captain.

Warners has picked up the life rights to Scott and has set Robert Schenkkan, a Emmy-nominated writer for his work on HBO’s acclaimed World War Two-set mini-series The Pacific, to write the script for the untitled true-life project. Schenkkan is working from a story by the Downeys, who are also producing via their Warners-based Team Downey banner.

In 1996, Scott was an 11-year old looking for a subject for a national History Day competition when he watched Jaws and was inspired by the scene of Robert Shaw as shark hunter Quint recalling the Indianapolis ordeal. That got Scott researching the topic, finding out how the warship was sunk by torpedoes and how for five days its stranded crew was slowly eaten by the finned meat-eaters.

Scott heard from survivors how the captain, Charles McVay, was unjustly court-martialed, and set out to correct the miscarriage of justice, eventually testifying before Congress. He was eventually instrumental in getting legislation passed in October 2000 to exonerate McVay, who committed suicide in 1968, and in July 2001, the U.S. Navy amended his record.

Schenkkan has the chops to tackle the story. In addition to his work on Pacific, he is currently writing the seven-hour mini-series America: In the King Years, the adaptation of the Taylor Branch book series from HBO and Oprah Winfrey. He also co-wrote the 2002 Phillip Noyce-directed thriller The Quiet American.

Jon Berg is overseeing the untitled Hunter Scott project for Warners. David Gambino is shepherding for Team Downey.

Not only has the Indianapolis sinking been found to be screen-worthy, Scott’s story too has been Hollywood bait. J.J. Abrams tried to bring the story to the screen via Universal but the project was put into turnaround in the late 2000s.

Hollywoodreporter.com

PHILADELPHIA—Richard “Dick” Winters, the Easy Company commander whose World War II exploits were chronicled in the book and TV miniseries “Band of Brothers,” died last week in central Pennsylvania at age 92.

Mr. Winters died following a several-year battle with Parkinson’s disease, longtime family friend William Jackson said Monday.

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0110wintersAssociated Press

Maj. Richard “Dick” Winters, pictured in 2002

An private and humble man, Mr. Winters had asked that news of his death be withheld until after his funeral, Mr. Jackson said. Mr. Winters lived in Hershey, Pa., but died in suburban Palmyra.

The men Mr. Winters led expressed their admiration for their company commander after learning of his death.

William Guarnere, 88, said what he remembers about Mr. Winters is “great leadership.”

"When he said ‘Let’s go,’ he was right in the front," Mr. Guarnere, who was called "Wild Bill" by his comrades, said Sunday night from his South Philadelphia home. "He was never in the back. A leader personified."

Another member of the unit living in Philadelphia, Edward Heffron, 87, said thinking about Mr. Winters brought a tear to his eye.

"He was one hell of a guy, one of the greatest soldiers I was ever under," said Mr. Heffron, who had the nickname "Babe" in the company. "He was a wonderful officer, a wonderful leader. He had what you needed, guts and brains. He took care of his men, that’s very important."

Mr. Winters was born Jan. 21, 1918, and studied economics at Franklin & Marshall College before enlisting, according to a biography on the Penn State website.

He became the leader of Company E, 506th Regiment, 101st Airborne Division on D-Day, after the death of the company commander during the invasion of Normandy.

During that invasion, Mr. Winters led 13 of his men in destroying an enemy battery and obtained a detailed map of German defenses along Utah Beach. In September 1944, he led 20 men in a successful attack on a German force of 200 soldiers. Occupying the Bastogne area of Belgium at the time of the Battle of the Bulge, he and his men held their place until the Third Army broke through enemy lines, and Mr. Winters shortly afterward was promoted to major.

After returning home, he married his wife, Ethel, in May 1948 and trained infantry and Army Ranger units at Fort Dix during the Korean War. He started a company selling livestock feed to farmers, and he and his family eventually settled in a farmhouse in Hershey, where he retired.

Historian Stephen Ambrose interviewed Mr. Winters for the 1992 book “Band of Brothers,” upon which the HBO miniseries that started airing in September 2001 was based. Mr. Winters himself published a memoir in 2006 entitled “Beyond Band of Brothers.”

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703779704576073703340092680.html?mod=WSJ_hpp_editorsPicks_3

I just heard about this. Make sure you go out and read or watch Band of Brothers to understand what this man and his comrades did. 

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